Potential vaccine being tested for COVID-19

Picture+Credit%3A+USA+Today

Picture Credit: USA Today

With the entire attention of the world focused on COVID-19, the race to find a vaccine or potential antidote for the virus has become a hot topic. More than ever researchers from all over the globe have come together in order to push the limits of Biochemistry in order to find a cure. 

A recent article written by Mark Johnson of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel specifically talks about the potential of finding a vaccine. 

Johnson writes, “Thursday’s announcement, more than three months into a pandemic that has killed 50,000 people and sickened almost 1 million worldwide, presents an urgent challenge to government regulators, who must weigh how much to speed up the vaccine approval process.”

Making the vaccine is somewhat the easy part, according to Johnson. The hardest part being getting it approved and the whole process of going through government regulators. 

According to jpost.com, or the Jerusalem Post, Israeli scientists are weeks away from possible vaccines for the virus. 

With such an immediate shift from the woes we have been in, a possible vaccine can almost seem like fantasy for many of the people across the world today. 

Even with such an addition of a vaccine it wouldn’t be ready as soon as it is created. The Jerusalem Post states “Once the vaccine is developed, it will take at least 90 days to complete the regulatory process and potentially more to enter the marketplace.”

This process is a lengthy and time consuming one, that has shown some of the flaws and weaknesses of government regulatory processes. More importantly the possibility of a cure is exciting and important for all those affected and the families affected by COVID-19.

Co-author Mark Johnson of the article posted in the Milwaukee Sentinel, is Louis Falo, whose unique proximity to the virus gives him a great perspective on the upcoming vaccine tests. 

He says “As far as reaching clinical trials, we would like to think a month, give or take. Maybe two months. We just started the process,” said co-author Louis Falo, a professor and chairman of the Department of Dermatology at the University of Pittsburgh.”

COVID-19 has run rampant throughout the globe more than ever possible vaccine tests are more and more important a vaccine could be the answer for life to return to normal.