March for science not silence

Yutzil Roman, Editor In Chief

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Earth Day marked a celebration of our planet and our place in it. Across the nation, March 22 also featured the March for Science. Despite the way in which marches and protests are portrayed in the media, as commercial events instead of powerful movements, this March for Science was completely necessary.

According to the March for Science campaign website, the goal of the marches was to “defend the role of science in policy and society.” The role of science is often under attack by politicians and conservatives who refuse to see its importance.

The March for Science was sparked by the current administration’s proposed budget, which aimed to decrease funding for institutions such as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). However, since the election it was clear that funding for scientific research and environmental resources was not a priority for Trump. Trump also down plays the impact of global warming through the media and his proposed policies.

According to the Washington Post, the March for Science took place in more than 600 cities in the United States and is one of the first national pro-science demonstration to attract incredible attention.

In Utah, marches were scheduled in Moab, Park City, Logan, and Salt Lake City. In Salt Lake, the march started at City Creek and moved up toward the state capitol. Thousands of people attended, including many students and faculty from the University of Utah.

According to Paul Gabrielsen, a senior science writer at the University of Utah, the march was not a “partisan statement.” In this case, partisan means a one-sided favoring of a particular issue. Instead, the marches were intended to raise awareness of the impact of science from medicine, to national security, to communications.

More importantly, people should be reminded that they have the right to participate in marches such as this one, without feeling radical or outrageous. People should know why they are marching and what changes they are hoping for. This would prevent bandwagon effects and the idea of joining a march just for the sake of joining.

Of course science is important. It governs much of our day to day routine and provides grounds for advances in health initiatives and technology. This means that movements such as the March for Science are positive reminders for communities about things that bring us together: science and the environment.

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