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The battle of art crimes

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The battle of art crimes

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-16/tagging-style-graffiti/6323444

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-16/tagging-style-graffiti/6323444

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-16/tagging-style-graffiti/6323444

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Some believe that the silent dance of defacing property is the right of freedom of speech. How ever it is clear that the creative expression to the destruction  of property is an excuse to vandalize public and private property, as you can be convicted of a crime for vandalism.

Mark Theoharis, Criminal Defense Lawyer wrote, “All states, as well as many municipalities, have laws that make it a crime to spray graffiti on property that you do not own or have permission to use.”

The accused in damages or destroys property, they must have evidence to show that they do not own the property and act willfully to guilty for vandalism, some evidence shows that many are tried for trespassing.

Theoharis says “Most graffiti crimes are charged as misdemeanors. City graffiti ordinances typically penalize people convicted of vandalism or graffiti spraying with a fine, though other sentences such as community service, probation and even jail sentences are possible as well.”

Cleaning and repairing the damaged property of the crime, can also cost the United states millions of dollars alone. In Seattle Washington $1 Million dollars and the metro city transit spent $734,000 for public transportation. Vandalism damage repairs and replacement for a small business owner is on average $3,370.

An article from the seattle times by Sonia Krishnan stated “Add it all up and, overall, city and county agencies are spending millions in tax dollars a year trying to combat the ubiquitous squiggles, tags, gang symbols and drawings that marr public property.”

The consequences for vandalism is taken seriously, and many are not caught, it can range differently depending on the damage.

“For example, if you are convicted of a graffiti crime in the state of Nevada, the penalty ranges from as little as fine of between $400 and $1,000 and serving 100 hours of community service, to as much as five years in a state prison and a $10,000 fine.” Theoharis claims.

Although felons are using graffiti as a creative expression, that is defacement and destruction of property.

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The battle of art crimes